Monthly Archives: August 2016

ForumSurfer – a RSS reader for the SQL Server online community


Today I published the first release of ForumSurfer, a RSS reader designed explicitly to be a tool for the SQL Server online community.

Here is a screenshot:

ForumSurfer

ForumSurfer has some unique features that will help you help others online:

  • it is designed to help you keep an eye on multiple communities through their RSS feeds
  • it opens questions in the integrated web browser
  • it can update from the feeds much more often than online RSS readers do
  • it has built-in support for boilerplate answers
  • it supports high-DPI displays, letting you choose the appropriate zoom level for individual sites
  • it can import/export OPML files (you can start by importing the OPML file containing all the online SQL Server communities I’m keeping on the radar)

What are you waiting for? Download now the latest release of ForumSurfer and start being helpful!

Did you find any issues? Report them or ping me on Twitter!

Advertisements

SSMS is now High-DPI ready


One of the most popular posts on this bog describes how to enable bitmap scaling is SSMS on high DPI displays, which is a sign that more and more people are starting to use 4K displays and are unhappy with SSMS’s behaviour at high DPI. The solution described in that post is to enable bitmap scaling, which renders graphic objects correctly, at the price of some blurriness.

The good news is that starting with SSMS 16.3 high DPI displays are finally first class citizens and SSMS does its best to scale objects properly. By default, SSMS will keep using bitmap scaling: in order to enable DPI scaling you will have to use a manifest file.

  1. Merge this key to your registry:
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\SideBySide]
"PreferExternalManifest"=dword:00000001
  1. Save this manifest file to “C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SQL Server\130\Tools\Binn\ManagementStudio\Ssms.exe.manifest” using UTF-8 format:
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<assembly xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1" manifestVersion="1.0" xmlns:asmv3="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v3">
    <asmv3:application>
        <asmv3:windowsSettings xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/SMI/2005/WindowsSettings">
            <dpiAware>True</dpiAware>
        </asmv3:windowsSettings>
    </asmv3:application>
    <dependency>
        <dependentAssembly>
            <assemblyIdentity type="win32" name="Microsoft.Windows.Common-Controls" version="6.0.0.0" processorArchitecture="X86" publicKeyToken="6595b64144ccf1df" language="*" />
        </dependentAssembly>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
        <dependentAssembly>
            <assemblyIdentity type="win32" name="debuggerproxy.dll" processorArchitecture="X86" version="1.0.0.0"></assemblyIdentity>
        </dependentAssembly>
    </dependency>
</assembly>

This is a huge improvement over the bitmap scaling solution we had to use up to now: no more blurriness and proper fonts are used in SSMS.

For comparison, this is how bitmap scaling renders in SSMS 2014:

SSMS2014

And this is how DPI scaling renders is SSMS 16.3, with scaling set to 200%:

SSMS2016

As you can see, it’s not perfect yet (for instance, I had to change the grid font size to 9pt. in order to have readable fonts).

However, the GUI is much more readable now. For instance, look at the difference in object explorer: (click on the image to open fullsize and see the difference)

objexp

Now that your favourite tool is working in high DPI displays, nothing is holding you back from buying one of those fancy 4K laptops!