Blog Archives

SQL Server Infernals – Circle 6: Environment Pollutors


Infernals

Don’t tell me that you didn’t see it coming: at some point, Developers end up being put to hell by a DBA!

I don’t want to enter the DBA/Developer wars, but some sins committed by Developers really deserve a ticket to the SQL Server hell. In particular, some of those sins are perpetrated when not even a single line of code is written yet and they have to do with the way the development environment is set up.

What they say in Heaven

Before starting a software project, the angelic developers set up their environment in the best of all ways, with proper environment isolation and definition. In particular they will have:

  • Development Environment: this is the place (ideally a dev’s desktop) where the development work is performed. It should resemble the production environment as much as possible.
  • Test Environment (QA): This is where the testers ensure the quality of the application, open bugs and review bug fixes. It should be identical to the production environment (in Heaven it is).
  • User Acceptance Test Environment (UAT): this is where the clients test the quality of third-party applications, request features and file bugs.
  • Staging Environment (Pre-Production): this environment is used to assemble, test and review newer versions of the database before it is moved into production. The hardware mirrors that of the production environment.
  • Production Environment: This is where the real database lives. It can be updated from the staging environment, when available, as well as new functionality and bug fixes release from UAT or staging environment.

If your organization or the project are small, you probably don’t need all of these environments. In Heaven, where time and money are not a constraint, they have all of them and they’re all identical to production. Heh, Heaven is Heaven after all…

Environmental sinners will face SQL Server’s judgement

Setting up your development environment in the wrong way can harm SQL Server (and your software) in many ways, right from the start of the project, throughout its whole lifetime. Let’s see some of the most common sins:

polluted

A notable example of Polluted Database

  1. Using the production environment for development: frankly, I don’t think this sin needs any further explanation. On the other hand, don’t assume that nobody’s doing it, despite we’re in 2015: lots of damned developers’ souls confess this sin while entering the SQL Server hell!
  1. Using the test environment for development: Again, this seems so obvious that there should be no need to discuss it: development is development and test is test. The test environment(s) should be used to test the application, not to see it breaking every minute because you changed something. Developing the code and testing it are two different things and, even if you happen to be in charge of both, this is not a good reason to confuse the two tasks.
  1. Using a shared instance for development: Back in the old days, when I was working as an ASP classic developer in a software house, we had a shared development environment on a central IIS server, where everyone saved their code on a shared folder and just had to hit F5 in Internet Explorer to see the changes immediately in action.
    If you think this model is foolish you’re 100% right, but in the 90s’ we didn’t know better. However, while everyone today agrees that it’s a terrible idea for code, you will still find hordes of developers not completely convinced that it’s an equally terrible idea as far as the database is concerned. Having a shared development database greatly simplifies the process of creating a consistent development database, which is a problem only if you have no authoritative source to build it from (which brings us to the next sin).
  1. No source control: Nobody in their right mind would start a software project today without using source control, yet source control for the database is still an esoteric topic, despite the plethora of tools to accomplish this task.
  1. Granting sysadmin rights to the application: If you’re using a local development instance (and you should), you probably are the administrator of that instance. Hey, nothing wrong with that, unless you use windows authentication in your application. In that case, whenever you debug the application in Visual Studio (or whatever you’re using), the application impersonates you (a sysadmin) when hitting the database, so there is no need to grant any permission in order to let the app perform anything on the instance.
    So, what happens when you’re done with development and you have to deploy in test (or, worse, production)? Exactly: nothing works, because (hopefully) the application won’t run with sysadmin privileges in production. At that point, extracting the complete lists of permissions needed by the application is an overwhelming task that you could have happily avoided by developing with a non-privileged user in the first place. When using a regular user, each time the application needs additional permissions, you simply have to add a GRANT statement to the deployment script, which also acts as the documentation the DBA will ask for.
    If you fail to provide this documentation, two things could happen: a) the DBA may refuse to deploy the database b) you could end up needing sysadmin privileges, which means a dedicated instance, which could in turn bring us back to a).
  1. Developing on a different version/edition from production: if your application is targeting SQL Server 2008 R2, developing on SQL Server 2012 could mean that you will discover incompatible T-SQL features after development. The same can be said for the SQL Server edition: if you are using a Developer Edition for development but you are targeting Standard Edition, you will discover the use of enterprise-only features when it’s too late. You can save yourself all the pain by using in development the same exact SQL Server version and edition you are targeting in production.

In the next episodes of SQL Server Infernals I’m afraid I will have to put more developers to hell. If you’re a developer, stay tuned to find out if your soul is a at risk! If you’re a DBA, stay tuned to enjoy seeing more developers damned!

Advertisements

Error upgrading MDW from 2008R2 to 2012


Some months ago I posted a method to overcome some quirks in the MDW database in a clustered environment.

Today I tried to upgrade that clustered instance (in a test environment, fortunately) and I got some really annoying errors.

Actually, I got what I deserved for messing with the system databases and I wouldn’t even dare posting my experience if  it wasn’t cause by something I suggested on this blog.

However, every cloud has a silver lining: many things can go wrong when upgrading a cluster and the resolution I will describe here can fit many failed upgrade situations.

So, what’s wrong with the solution I proposed back in march?

The offending line in that code is the following:

EXEC sp_rename 'core.source_info_internal', 'source_info_internal_ms'

What happened here? Basically, I renamed a table in the MDW and I created a view in its place.

One of the steps of the setup process tries to upgrade the MDW database with a script, that is executed at the first startup on an upgraded cluster node.

The script fails and the following message is found in the ERRORLOG:

Creating table [core].[source_info_internal]...
2013-10-24 09:21:02.99 spid8s Error: 2714, Severity: 16, State: 6.
2013-10-24 09:21:02.99 spid8s There is already an object named 'source_info_internal' in the database.
2013-10-24 09:21:02.99 spid8s Error: 912, Severity: 21, State: 2.
2013-10-24 09:21:02.99 spid8s Script level upgrade for database 'master' failed because upgrade step 'upgrade_ucp_cmdw.sql' encountered error 3602, state 51, severity 25. This is a serious error condition which might interfere with regular operation and the database will be taken offline. If the error happened during upgrade of the 'master' database, it will prevent the entire SQL Server instance from starting. Examine the previous errorlog entries for errors, take the appropriate corrective actions and re-start the database so that the script upgrade steps run to completion.
2013-10-24 09:21:02.99 spid8s Error: 3417, Severity: 21, State: 3.
2013-10-24 09:21:02.99 spid8s Cannot recover the master database. SQL Server is unable to run. Restore master from a full backup, repair it, or rebuild it. For more information about how to rebuild the master database, see SQL Server Books Online.

Every attempt to bring the SQL Server resource online results in a similar error message.

The only way to fix the error is to restore the initial state of the MDW database, renaming the table core.source_info_internal_ms to its original name.

But how can it be done, since the instance refuses to start?

Microsoft added and documented trace flag 902, that can be used to bypass the upgrade scripts at instance startup.

Remember that the startup parameters of a clustered instance cannot be modified while the resource is offline, because the registry checkpointing mechanism will restore the registry values stored in the quorum disk while bringing the resource online.

There are three ways to start the instance in this situation:

  1. modify the startup parameters by disabling checkpointing
  2. modify the startup parameters in the quorum registry hives
  3. start the instance manually at the command prompt

Method N.3 is the simplest one in this situation and is what I ended up doing.

Once the instance started, I renamed the view core.source_info_internal and renamed core.source_info_internal_ms to its original name.

The instance could then be stopped (CTRL+C at the command prompt or SHUTDOWN WITH NOWAIT in sqlcmd) and restarted removing the trace flag.

With the MDW in its correct state, the upgrade scripts completed without errors and the clustered instance could be upgraded to SQL Server 2012 without issues.

Lessons learned:

  1. Never, ever mess with the system databases. The MDW is not technically a system database, but it’s shipped by Microsoft and should be kept untouched. If you decide you absolutely need to modify something there, remember to undo your changes before upgrading and applying service packs.
  2. Always test your environment before upgrading. It took me 1 hour to fix the issue and not every upgrade scenario tolerates 1 hour of downtime. Think about it.
  3. Test your upgrade.
  4. Did I mention you need to test?

Jokes aside, I caught my error in a test environment and I’m happy it was not in production.

As the saying goes, better safe than sorry.